How much disability can I get for my Atlanta workers’ compensation claim?

Workers’ comp pay in Georgia is usually two-thirds of your average weekly salary, depending  on how much you make and when your accident occurred. However, there are caps on the pay. You will only receive two-thirds of your average weekly wage if the payment is not more than $675.00 per week. Being on workers’ comp disability can be frustrating if $675/week is less than 2/3 of your weekly income. Keep in mind, however, that the workers comp payments are not taxed. 

What kind of benefits do you get from workers’ comp?

Workers’ compensation benefits include wage benefits as outlined above. Also medical benefits that include doctor and hospital bills, prescriptions and mileage to and from appointments. You may also receive one of these four disability benefits: 

  • Temporary total disability benefits: These benefits, as determined by GA Code § 34-9-261, begin when you miss more than seven days of work due to your work injury and stop when you recover from your injury or are released to return to normal duty work, often at maximum medical improvement (MMI). MMI is when the doctor determines that your injury or medical condition will not further improve.
  • Temporary partial disability benefits: These benefits, as determined by GA Code § 34-9-262, are paid when you can work but not at the wage you earned before your workplace injury, for example if your employer places you on light duty or you have to work fewer hours. They generally stop when the doctor determines your condition has improved as much as it can (you’ve reached MMI) and that you can return to normal duty work.
  • Permanent total disability benefits: These benefits are paid once the doctor determines you’ve reached MMI and has assessed your condition to determine your eligibility for disability benefits. To qualify for permanent total disability benefits, your condition must be severe and you will receive an amount equal to the rate of your temporary total disability benefits for life.
  • Permanent partial disability benefits: These benefits are paid once the doctor determines you’ve reached MMI and has assessed your condition to determine your eligibility for disability benefits. Permanent partial disability benefits are compensation for the damage done to a particular body part as determined by GA Code § 34-9-263.

How much pay can you get for workers’ comp?

The amount you file for in a workers’ compensation case will be depend on the specifics of your situation. Your wage history, the amount of your medical bills, the type of injuries you have, and your ability to go back to work will all play a role in determining your workers’ comp payment. If you are unable to return to work because of permanent injuries, or are unable to resume your former job, these will add to the amount you are entitled to because of permanent disabilities or your need to learn a new vocation in order to get back to your former earning potential.

Do you need a workers’ comp lawyer?

You are not required to hire a lawyer for a workers’ compensation process if there is nothing out of the ordinary. However, if your employer decides to dispute your claim, or if there are complications to your claims process, the help of a legal professional is extremely helpful. Contact us to discuss the specifics of your injury, the claim process, and to identify any potential complications that may arise before you begin this process. If you have determined that you do not have the time, energy, or understanding to maneuver this process with the certainty that you will be awarded all that you are owed, then having a lawyer through the process is a major benefit.

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